LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©

Whether or not women always wore jackets over stays or jumps is a hotly debated topic, some saying “always”, some disagreeing depending on whether they were at home going about their daily routine or not.  There are paintings from the period which depict women working in a shift and stays without a jacket.  I doubtContinue reading “LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©”

LADIES’ CAPS©

Caps were worn by all classes, the difference being primarily the fineness of the fabric and level of decoration with ruffles and other trim.  Women weren’t as likely to wear caps in a formal setting as in doing work or “undress” (at home).  Almost always, the caps were white, the exception being a pink capContinue reading “LADIES’ CAPS©”

LADIES JACKETS: Mid to Late 18th Century©

Jackets were made of wool, silk, linen, Chintz etc. Length varied, somewhat, with the decades. They were worn for work or for dress as was determined by cut and fineness of fabric. They could be accessorized similarly to gowns and even working class women are sometimes seen in paintings with some form of jewelry.

Review of Nancy Loane’s Following the Drum

As a writer, I deplore the passing along of inaccurate undocumented information and I’m happy to see Ms. Loane debunk some of the Martha Washington myths that arose during the flowery Victorian era. A primary source is one written by someone who personally witnessed an event and wrote about it in a timely manner (beforeContinue reading “Review of Nancy Loane’s Following the Drum

GARDENER: Seed Saving Prior to the Nineteenth Century©

This is part of our series on eighteenth century occupations prior to, and following, the wars.  Gardening was necessary and before one can grow vegetables, herbs, grasses for forage, or flowers he must have seeds.  Saving seeds from one year to the next was economical and perpetuated select varieties when properly harvested.  For those ofContinue reading “GARDENER: Seed Saving Prior to the Nineteenth Century©”

Military Hygiene for Revolutionary War Troops© – By: Victoria Brady

A description of General Washington during the war was published in 1823 which coincides with what was expected from his troops. “His dress. being suited to the road, was simple and plain, but such as was worn by the higher class of his countrymen: he wore his own hair, dressed in a manner that gaveContinue reading “Military Hygiene for Revolutionary War Troops© – By: Victoria Brady”

GATHERING BASKETS: Description and Function©

Eighteenth century farmers understood basket-making and it formed part of his occupation in winter evenings. Due to the availability of purchased materials and baskets this practice was of less importance by the 1840s although it was still recommended every gardener, forester, and woodman understand how to make a basket. Eighteenth century farmers often maintained theirContinue reading “GATHERING BASKETS: Description and Function©”

APRONS As a Fashion Statement©

Those of us of a “certain age” know aprons as a sometimes pretty, but basically utilitarian, item of clothing meant to keep the dress underneath clean. Aprons stood laundering better than period dresses and there were thousands of these worn in earlier centuries. There were, however, some aprons that were strictly made and worn asContinue reading “APRONS As a Fashion Statement©”

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, CRAFTS, TRADES, & EMPLOYMENTS©

I started a simple compilation of trades from the 18th century with the intention of explaining them in blog articles for the use of anyone who wants to create a first person character; however, I am such a diligent (compulsive) researcher this treatise quickly surpassed 170 pages and continues to grow. This will be farContinue reading “EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, CRAFTS, TRADES, & EMPLOYMENTS©”