A BRIEF LOOK AT TRANSLATIONS OF THE BIBLE©

The source of this information is given at the end.  It is a condensed version of the Introduction found in an 18th century Bible.  Anyone interested in purchasing a period Bible might want to check out Greatsite.com.  They offer quality facsimile editions of several historic Bibles and they are knowledgeable, friendly and eager to assistContinue reading “A BRIEF LOOK AT TRANSLATIONS OF THE BIBLE©”

Woven and Checked Cotton©

There has been some notion espoused among a few amateur historic clothing enthusiasts that there were no cotton woven checks or plaids in the 18th century or that checked cotton was not used for clothing.  I don’t agree, but after reading a few notations, you may decide for yourself what you think.  The theory thatContinue reading “Woven and Checked Cotton©”

CLOTHING COLORS IN THE 18TH CENTURY©

One of the least understood aspect of 18th century clothing is the colors available in fabric, threads, and other materials such as embroidery floss.  A common myth is that they wore only blue and brown and nothing could be farther from the truth.  A cursory look at fabric swatch books from the period will quicklyContinue reading “CLOTHING COLORS IN THE 18TH CENTURY©”

Mend It, Patch It, Make It Do©

While we strive for historical accuracy to the strictest degree in everything we make, it is important to realize the common person was not error-proof in making clothing and accessories. In the following photos the reader will see what might today be viewed as shoddy workmanship, however, for several reasons these garments are not extraordinary.Continue reading “Mend It, Patch It, Make It Do©”

A La Polinaise

Polinaise is a fancy way of saying the skirt of a jacket is bunched up in the back.  Costume historians disagree on the specifics which will be largely ignored here as originals are found to support both theories.  There is no question that the bunched-up skirts were worn and that they can be accurately recreated,Continue reading “A La Polinaise”

Muffs: A Useful Accessory

Muffs were used for centuries to keep the hands warm, and sometimes to keep up with incidental items. The diarist, Samuel Pepys penned on Sunday Nov. 30, 1662, “This day I first did wear a muffe, being my wife’s last year’s muffe, and now I have bought her a new one, this serves me veryContinue reading “Muffs: A Useful Accessory”

Last Will & Testament of George Washington

The following is the will left by George Washington in which he provides for his widow, Martha Washington, and an extensive list of relatives who either profited by the forgiveness of a debt or by receiving specified property.  He was obviously a wealthy man.   He provided for the freedom of his slaves upon Martha’sContinue reading “Last Will & Testament of George Washington”

Marker Dedication

Sunday, December 6, 2020 the Alabama Society DAR, Phillip Hamman Chapter, dedicated a grave marker for Revolutionary War soldier, Phillip Hamman. The Alabama Society SAR were invited to be Color Guard. Phillip Hamman arrived in America from Germany on 16 October, 1772, debarking from the ship Crawford, after which he settled in Greenbrier Valley, Virginia.Continue reading “Marker Dedication”

LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©

Whether or not women always wore jackets over stays or jumps is a hotly debated topic, some saying “always”, some disagreeing depending on whether they were at home going about their daily routine or not.  There are paintings from the period which depict women working in a shift and stays without a jacket.  I doubtContinue reading “LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©”