Muffs: A Useful Accessory

Muffs were used for centuries to keep the hands warm, and sometimes to keep up with incidental items. The diarist, Samuel Pepys penned on Sunday Nov. 30, 1662, “This day I first did wear a muffe, being my wife’s last year’s muffe, and now I have bought her a new one, this serves me veryContinue reading “Muffs: A Useful Accessory”

Last Will & Testament of George Washington

The following is the will left by George Washington in which he provides for his widow, Martha Washington, and an extensive list of relatives who either profited by the forgiveness of a debt or by receiving specified property.  He was obviously a wealthy man.   He provided for the freedom of his slaves upon Martha’sContinue reading “Last Will & Testament of George Washington”

Marker Dedication

Sunday, December 6, 2020 the Alabama Society DAR, Phillip Hamman Chapter, dedicated a grave marker for Revolutionary War soldier, Phillip Hamman. The Alabama Society SAR were invited to be Color Guard. Phillip Hamman arrived in America from Germany on 16 October, 1772, debarking from the ship Crawford, after which he settled in Greenbrier Valley, Virginia.Continue reading “Marker Dedication”

LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©

Whether or not women always wore jackets over stays or jumps is a hotly debated topic, some saying “always”, some disagreeing depending on whether they were at home going about their daily routine or not.  There are paintings from the period which depict women working in a shift and stays without a jacket.  I doubtContinue reading “LADIES CASUAL CLOTHING: Stays vs. Sans Stays©”

LADIES’ CAPS©

Caps were worn by all classes, the difference being primarily the fineness of the fabric and level of decoration with ruffles and other trim.  Women weren’t as likely to wear caps in a formal setting as in doing work or “undress” (at home).  Almost always, the caps were white, the exception being a pink capContinue reading “LADIES’ CAPS©”

LADIES JACKETS: Mid to Late 18th Century©

Jackets were made of wool, silk, linen, Chintz etc. Length varied, somewhat, with the decades. They were worn for work or for dress as was determined by cut and fineness of fabric. They could be accessorized similarly to gowns and even working class women are sometimes seen in paintings with some form of jewelry.

Review of Nancy Loane’s Following the Drum

As a writer, I deplore the passing along of inaccurate undocumented information and I’m happy to see Ms. Loane debunk some of the Martha Washington myths that arose during the flowery Victorian era. A primary source is one written by someone who personally witnessed an event and wrote about it in a timely manner (beforeContinue reading “Review of Nancy Loane’s Following the Drum

GARDENER: Seed Saving Prior to the Nineteenth Century©

This is part of our series on eighteenth century occupations prior to, and following, the wars.  Gardening was necessary and before one can grow vegetables, herbs, grasses for forage, or flowers he must have seeds.  Saving seeds from one year to the next was economical and perpetuated select varieties when properly harvested.  For those ofContinue reading “GARDENER: Seed Saving Prior to the Nineteenth Century©”

Military Hygiene for Revolutionary War Troops© – By: Victoria Brady

A description of General Washington during the war was published in 1823 which coincides with what was expected from his troops. “His dress. being suited to the road, was simple and plain, but such as was worn by the higher class of his countrymen: he wore his own hair, dressed in a manner that gaveContinue reading “Military Hygiene for Revolutionary War Troops© – By: Victoria Brady”